BronxWench

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  1. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Desiderius Price in Black diamonds in stories   
    UTF-8 rocks, saying that as a coder.  You can’t tell the difference when it’s English, pretty minimal overhead in the related European languages, and able to handle all the languages.  Main drawback is if you’re dealing mostly in the asian languages, it’ll be a bit larger in file/data size than UTF-16.
  2. Like
    BronxWench reacted to menamerized in New? Introduce Yourself!   
    Better late than never, I suppose.
    I'm Elyse. She/They.
    Most of the things I write are on AO3 but I might post some here at some point. 
     
  3. Like
    BronxWench reacted to WillowDarkling in No Password Reset Email   
    Adding, now that I’ve had a chance to take a look on my computer, it appears that the problem has been fixed, so being the complete computer-illiterate that I am, I’m going to suggest you clear all cookies and caches, paying special attention to all AFF related cookies, close down the browser and restart it, and then try again to get the password reset email. 
    If that doesn’t work, provide us with a link to your account, and tell us what type of email you have (gmail, hotmail, outlook etc. Since I don’t recommend posting your full email address in a public forum) and our head moderator will take a look for you as soon as she can. 
  4. Like
    BronxWench reacted to GeorgeGlass in "Nonsense reviews"   
    About a month ago, I got a few more “reviews” like these, so I turned off anonymous reviewing for a couple of days. Now I’m getting them again, and it seems to be on the exact same stories as before. I think, as an experiment, I’ll try not turning off anonymous reviews and see if these just stop on their own.
  5. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from GeorgeGlass in Spam review   
    I deleted it. They posted it as an anonymous reviewer, so the only option is to turn off anonymous reviews, unfortunately.
  6. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Nomadic in Ka Pait   
    Author: Nomadic
    Title: Ka Pait
    Summary: Asher is hooked on heroin and leaves behind a string of bad decisions when he's found by Charles in Grande, Nevada. Charles enables his habit and keeps him fed and warm without demanding anything of him. For Asher, though, no luck is good luck. Charles's good nature and charity come with a price. Soon after meeting him, Asher is whisked away to a new planet with a problem that he is not a part of solving. He is something extra to deal with - so they deal with him by selling him to the highest bidder.
    Feedback: Feedback is welcome. 
    Fandom: This is an original work. 
    Pairing: Just whoever. m/m
    Warnings: Abuse AFFO Anal Angst BDSM Bigotry BMod Bond Dom Drugs Ds HC HJ MM Ms OC Oral Rape SandM SH Slave Spank Tort Toys Violence Xeno
    Solo story or chaptered story: Chapter (so far 20) 
    URL: Ka Pait
    Review Thread: Review Thread
    I had an outline of what was happening – but as I actually wrote Asher has decided he’s doing other things. Same with Jaquorra. They have made decisions and honestly, I’m thrilled to write it. Please tip your server. (R&R)
  7. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Desiderius Price in Names for OCs   
    Oh, name duplication does happen in real life.  Got a number of alter egos if I do a goggle search on my own name, a lawyer, a director of a food company, a firefighter? etc.  Even an occasional issue at work where there’s duplicates in the global org-wide email address list, if people don’t realize that my real legal first name *is* the short version, not the customary long version (an assumption that’s valid 85% ofthe time, but I’m not in that 85% group).
    Issue comes to writing a story, if you had a story full of John Smiths, how do you distinguish them to the reader?  In a movie, it’s less problematic, because unless the actors looked the same, the viewer would get the drift. 
    Another J example is that I have “Joe” as a major character (short for Joseph).  His mother “Josephine”, those two, role wise are easier.  However, a side character coming in was Joey, see where the confusion can come in?  Especially if I fat finger the name while writing?  You typically don’t want to (unintentionally) confuse the reader more than you have to.  Of course, having a duplicate name might be a good plot point too, but you still need some distinction for the reader.
    Now, in my main potter fanfic, the perpetrator is making heavy use of Polyjuice (or an equivalent), impersonating Harry while doing nefarious deeds.  However, makes it challenging because as the narrator, I don’t want to call the doppelganger “Harry”, so I’ll go “raven haired boy” or similar descriptions.  It still comes to the same philosophy of not wanting to confuse the reader to what’s happening (aside from deliberate misdirection).
  8. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Wilde_Guess in Names for OCs   
    That can happen if the breadth and or the depth of your universe of named important characters gets large.  That also happens in real life, too.  And sometimes, the most “generic” name a society has to offer can ultimately name great heroes, great villains, and people of major achievement that while not evil aren’t valorous either.
    “John Smith” is considered a very generic name.  Yet this name was borne by a colonial governor of what became Virginia, a modern television actor, and a furniture merchant with a fondness for the letter “y”  who sold his goods on credit to the citizens of Chicago immediately after they were all burned-out (literally) in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.  The eponymous furniture store that merchant created, John M. Smyth, remained in business for just over 140 years.
    You will also find that certain ages in certain societies will have given names become so popular that they are overused in one generation and fall almost completely out of use in the next.  “Adolph” was once a moderately popular given name.  For some strange reason, that name became very unpopular after the mid 1940s.
    While not likely in real life, it is in fact possible to have two people with the same exact name, who not only can’t trace back to a common ancestor closer than 500 years, but who are diametrically opposed to, and loathe each other.  Or, with a different switch flipped, they can be closer than actual brothers, or in these modern times even become spouses to each other.
     
    Thanks.
  9. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Desiderius Price in Names for OCs   
    I started to foul up on my originals … now I’m bit more aware.  A substantial number had “J” as the first initial, became worse when a number started with “Ja” and you’d have to go to THREE letters in to get them any different.  Too late to correct all of them, however, I’ve been trying to introduce nicknames for secondary characters.  Too similar and the names blend together in the readers minds.
  10. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Ghost-of-a-Chance in Names for OCs   
    My process varies depending on what exactly I’m writing. For some of my original fiction, I tend to use a blend of “words from nature,” “elaborated words from nature,” and “take parts of actual words or names, mash them together with other syllables from other words and names, and boom, insta-name.” It’s gotten some pretty interesting results like Anabreth, Kessenjer, and Benekeed. It fits for a fantasy-setting culture in another world but it would not fit for most stories.
    Fanfiction and other fiction? That process is more...complicated. Sometimes with some characters, a name for them literally just pops up as I’m building the character and sticks. Other times I scour baby name directories, popular media, and websites, and choose what works best for the time. Usually I follow a precedent my family (unintentionally?) set: “Every girl needs an adult name and an old lady name, and one of those names needs to be adaptable into a cute nickname for when they’re kids.” Some fandoms (or families) also have trends for naming – characters in a lot of anime have names based in nature, especially food, and sometimes families follow naming customs passed down. Heck, I know of a person who has several kids, all of whom have an X or Y somewhere in their name. (Yes, he’s white.)
    Overall, I think, if you’re worried your OC name will sound Sue-ish or too unusual, there’s an easy way to figure it out. Imagine you just met a new friend and you’re introducing them to someone. Could be your parents, your Nana, or even just that fusty granny who lives next door and always gets up in your business. Imagine yourself saying the character’s name to this person. Did they cringe? Did their eyebrows disappear into their hair? Did they snort under their breath, imitate a codfish, or otherwise react impolitely? If so, the name’s probably going to stand out and maybe too much. Sometimes having an outlandish name can be a good thing – ie, recurring jokes or character reactions to their names – and likewise for excessively bland names.
    Whatever you choose, just be sure you make it work.
  11. Haha
    BronxWench reacted to JayDee in Names for OCs   
    My rule is usually pretty simple – is it a fucking stupid name? If so, I’ll probably use it.
  12. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Wilde_Guess in Names for OCs   
    Hello, all.
    For what it’s worth, If I’m writing fanfiction, I try to follow the naming rules and conventions of the series, if I don’t outright hijack a named “background” character and bring them to the forground.  For example, if writing in Naruto/Boruto, I would be far more likely to write about Uzumaki Kenshin than Ebeneezer MacPhalus.  Likewise, were I to write a Manwha fanfiction, I would only use Korean names, reserving Japanese names for villains.  If I write a James Bond fanfiction, the names of the principal villains and love interests could get more intriguing, because the source material itself makes this okay.  If writing Nero Wolfe, I would tend to use names common to the Northeastern United States, with the ability to use names from almost any real “anywhere else,” since it is New York City where the fabled brownstone with the rooftop orchid garden is located.
    Iin the Rowlingverse, I never name Hermione’s parents “Dan and Emma,” even if I make Ron Weasley Lord Voldemort’s more intelligent BDSM sub slave MPREG love interest (and I think i just puked in my mouth writing that.)  While in the Rowlingverse, I also use names in common usage in the United Kingdom during the time the story takes place for non-Wizarding-Culture raised, and names in semi-common usage in the United Kingdom roughly fifty to one hundred years earlier for the Wizarding Culture wizards except for families with their own naming convention such as the Blacks.
    In original fiction, the names of the characters should fit the time, location, and social station of the character.  “Stripper names” are generally used for strippers.  Likewise, if a character receives a name that is “less fitting” to their times, they can certainly go by a different nickname, or at least make some note of their naming dissatisfaction.  Sometimes, whether and how a character shortens their name is a clue to their personality, or at least their “comfort in their own skin.”  Someone attending Harvard in 1801 would likely not share the name of someone attending high school in Harvard, Illinois in 2001.  Likewise, unless they hot-wired a TARDIS, Dwezel and Moon Unit would not be named participants in any battle of the US War for Independence.  Different countries also have their own societal quirks.  You are more likely to encounter a full-Anglo Ichigo in the United States than you are a full-Yamato Herbert in Japan.
    In an “fantasy original” fiction, the names need to make some sense within that universe.  Even in such a universe, an “odd” name can find a place, though it will be questioned by the readers, and perhaps should be questioned by the other characters themselves.  The Dark Elf whose elven name translates in the the “common” “He who sodomizes bull whales” should frequently be asked, “But does the whale actually realize that you’re there?  And what should happen should your new friend return the favor?”
    Of course, in a parody or farce, going absolutely the opposite way of normal naming conventions can also make sense.  For example, in Bleach your super-villain could be Elisabeth Henry, with her plot to hasten Ragnarok by forcing all the Quincys and Hollows of Huecho Mundo to actually drink the water without boiling it first for at least three minutes, followed by eating the worm and licking the toad.
    Cheers!
  13. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Desiderius Price in Names for OCs   
    For main characters, I put more thought into it.  For side/background characters, I’m more likely to use a random name generator for guidance.  (Trouble is, I’ll use create a side/background character, and *THEN* decide to center a story around them, well, I’m generally not renaming them.)
  14. Like
    BronxWench reacted to GeorgeGlass in Names for OCs   
    For human characters who are not from a fantasy world (and for furries who have human names), I try to avoid using the same name twice, at least for major characters. (I actually keep a list of all the names I’ve used.) I think this helps make my stories more interesting.
    For whatever reason, sometimes I like to give sexy female characters names that I don’t think of as sexy at all, like Geraldine, Enid, and Mitzi. 
     
  15. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Wilde_Guess in Names for OCs   
    For me, it depends on my setting. My original fantasy settings seem to work best when I use Irish or Welsh names. I’m also not above using Quenya or Sindarin for naming elven characters. For anything original with a contemporary setting, I try to use contemporary names without sliding into the overly unique. There is nothing at all wrong with a simple name.
    Fandom just means I need to stick to the ‘verse as far as naming conventions. As a caveat, my fandoms tend to revolve around CRPGs that I enjoy, so it helps to know what influenced the devs of the game. I’m pretty sure no one in the Dragon Age universe is going to have a Japanese name, although the Forgotten Realms game of Baldur’s Gate 2 does have one particular NPC from Kara-Tur named Yoshimo.
     
  16. Haha
    BronxWench reacted to Wilde_Guess in Why Mary Sue Litmus Tests Suck   
    Hi, all.
    That sounds like it would be really rough for Transformers fanfiction.
    “But my character is a canon when they transform….”
    Thanks.
     
  17. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Wilde_Guess in Character's job title   
    I like broker or fixer myself. Nicely ambiguous, and doesn’t always imply mayhem for hire. Although factotum appeals to my love of extraordinary words… 
  18. Haha
    BronxWench reacted to JayDee in Throw your ideas in here!   
    Well. It’s October. I got nothing worth a damn. Hardly have any ideas. Forgot how to write. Even reading is proving tough to maintain concentration. But, here:
    **
    A vampire suffers from low self esteem because the others are all Counts while he is just a local squire.
    **
    An exhibitionist finds themselves trapped amongst the deaf, mute, and blind.
    **
    After a particularly heavy session on Arthur Guinness’s finest, The Dullahan wakes up to find his head has married one sister and his body has married the other, and they hate the sight of each other. His hungover horse says “I did say nay.”
    **
    A user splits Microsoft’s One Note into two notes and the resulting energy release scours the surface of the Earth clean of life, except for a group of deep miners who emerge into the smoking ruins of the world.
    **
    A supervillain launches a diabolical scheme to turn all the world’s porn furry.
    **
    As the heat death of the universe finally winds down to stillness at the end of all things, a stillness that cannot even truly be called eternal for eternity requires the passage of time and even time will end, Valve releases Half-Life 3
    **
    The abandoned Mars Rovers return…. and they are HORNY.
  19. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Desiderius Price in How do you know if people like your story?   
    I might be the odd man out here, but I actually just want to know if people have reacted to my story at all. I don’t care if they don’t love it, and I’m generally not surprised if people hate it, but I’d love a reaction.
    Back when I had more time, I tried to read more and I’d make a point of reviewing when I read. (Thanks to a hiccup, my account was inadvertently deleted, which left all my old reviews anonned, but hopefully that won’t matter to the authors I reviewed.) Sometimes when I was sweeping in the archive, I’d come across a new story in a fandom I might not normally have pursued for leisure reading, and I’d make a point to go back, read properly, and review. I’m fairly specific about fandoms, however, and I have my personal squicks which I will avoid diligently for leisure reading, so I might not get around to reading everything. I’m hoping I’ll be able to find more time to just read again, and when I read, I review!
  20. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Desiderius Price in How do you know if people like your story?   
    Trust me, if I was able to write code, I’d be working on a few projects for AFF, based on the number of people who are asking for the same thing: recognition that their stories are being read.
    Part of the problem with reviews, and I’m opening a can of worms here, I know, is the ever-popular cancel culture mentality.
    It’s unfortunately the case that some writers do NOT respond well to anything other than a complete squee. If you aren’t gushing about their cleverness, or the adorableness of their characters, or the genius of the pairing they chose from their fandom, the reaction to the review will be either a deletion of the review, a huffy author’s note mention of people who can’t accept artistic quality without complaining, or a combination of both. Even the mildest of questions can provoke a fit of pique from these writers, and after a time, most reviewers will quietly move on to another story. For myself, I adore constructive criticism. Tell me what didn’t work for you, because that’s how I can continue to hone my own writing. Squeeing about my work tells me bugger-all.
    On the other hand, we have reviewers who, quite simply, can’t write a review. A personal attack on the writer is not a review; it is a personal attack on the writer and deserves deletion of the review and quite possibly the reviewer’s account as well. A review berating the inclusion of something that was quite clearly covered in the story tags, tags which the reviewer managed to overlook in their entirety, is not at all helpful to the writer, and only serves to highlight the reviewer’s own lack of mental acuity. As an example, I detest scat. If a story is tagged for that particular content, and I read it anyway, I have NO right whatsoever to berate the author for having scat in the story. I’m the idiot who ignored the tags, so shame on me for being feckless.
    The biggest issue for me is always going to be the motivation for me to write. Do I write to collect dragon prints, or hit points, or kudos? Or do I write because the stories in my head won’t go away otherwise?
  21. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Wilde_Guess in Clothing in Stories- Descriptions and Tastes   
    I guess for me it really does depend on how necessary the detail is for the story. I tend to like to leave a good bit to the reader’s imagination, so if I’m talking about a male character in an everyday setting, I might mention that he wore a blue linen shirt, open at the throat and with the sleeves folded back, over a pair of tan chinos. (Yes, business casual, sorry...) It’s a pretty generic description, and the reader can imagine the shade of blue they like best, whether or not it’s a buttondown collar, if the tails are tucked in or hanging out, or if the chinos are pleated or flat-front.
    Now, if I was describing a bondage collar, I might say it had a black leather gorget, lined with silk, with a gleaming d-ring for a leash on the front, and so on. That sort of kit really does need more detail, in my opinion, if you have a certain position or image of the bound character that is crucial to the story. Or you can just go for the wrists tied to the headboard with an old school tie, or the belt from a bathrobe, if you want fast and dirty, and get teh characters naked as fast as possible to avoid having to describe clothing.
    Women’s clothing, unfortunately, tends to be ridiculously fussy when it comes to suggestive/revealing/sexy wear. The dress you linked above? It could be described as a clinging, highnecked sheath with cutouts down the front, or perhaps with strips of fabric criss-crossing her taut abdomen to reveal tawny skin. Google fashion sites, like Des suggested, and try to find ones with descriptions of the clothing to get an idea of ways to get it across to a reader.
  22. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Wilde_Guess in Clothing in Stories- Descriptions and Tastes   
    Have you considered that this is George’s phone? Trust me, its web-browsing history is legendary.  Rather like its spell check and predictive typing.  
  23. Like
    BronxWench reacted to Desiderius Price in How do you know if people like your story?   
    I know I had offered at one point, however, that faded and I’ve been focusing more on my own world-building software assistant (ie, database + wiki + cool analytics).  Not asking for new features, simply illustrating how I use the existing features to try to crack that same question.
    That is a can of worms, I’m not of fan of canceling/scrubbing-from-history of things I don’t agree with.
    I’ll err on the side of over-tagging instead of under-tagging.  Though I’ll now categorize the tags in the opening of the story, noting which ones are more (CYA) and which ones are “features”/main-themes.
    I’d love to say I write fine in a vacuum, but I don’t.  I do need that occasional pat on the back, the kudos, to keep the motivation.  Otherwise, I’ll drift away with “got better things to do at the moment?” which morphs into “why bother?” and I move along.  Thus, I record my dragon prints every so often, which helps, to a degree.
     
    What *does* help is that as I’ve been squeezing on the finances, it keeps other distracting hobbies at bay.
  24. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Desiderius Price in How do you know if people like your story?   
    Trust me, if I was able to write code, I’d be working on a few projects for AFF, based on the number of people who are asking for the same thing: recognition that their stories are being read.
    Part of the problem with reviews, and I’m opening a can of worms here, I know, is the ever-popular cancel culture mentality.
    It’s unfortunately the case that some writers do NOT respond well to anything other than a complete squee. If you aren’t gushing about their cleverness, or the adorableness of their characters, or the genius of the pairing they chose from their fandom, the reaction to the review will be either a deletion of the review, a huffy author’s note mention of people who can’t accept artistic quality without complaining, or a combination of both. Even the mildest of questions can provoke a fit of pique from these writers, and after a time, most reviewers will quietly move on to another story. For myself, I adore constructive criticism. Tell me what didn’t work for you, because that’s how I can continue to hone my own writing. Squeeing about my work tells me bugger-all.
    On the other hand, we have reviewers who, quite simply, can’t write a review. A personal attack on the writer is not a review; it is a personal attack on the writer and deserves deletion of the review and quite possibly the reviewer’s account as well. A review berating the inclusion of something that was quite clearly covered in the story tags, tags which the reviewer managed to overlook in their entirety, is not at all helpful to the writer, and only serves to highlight the reviewer’s own lack of mental acuity. As an example, I detest scat. If a story is tagged for that particular content, and I read it anyway, I have NO right whatsoever to berate the author for having scat in the story. I’m the idiot who ignored the tags, so shame on me for being feckless.
    The biggest issue for me is always going to be the motivation for me to write. Do I write to collect dragon prints, or hit points, or kudos? Or do I write because the stories in my head won’t go away otherwise?
  25. Like
    BronxWench got a reaction from Desiderius Price in How do you know if people like your story?   
    I might be the odd man out here, but I actually just want to know if people have reacted to my story at all. I don’t care if they don’t love it, and I’m generally not surprised if people hate it, but I’d love a reaction.
    Back when I had more time, I tried to read more and I’d make a point of reviewing when I read. (Thanks to a hiccup, my account was inadvertently deleted, which left all my old reviews anonned, but hopefully that won’t matter to the authors I reviewed.) Sometimes when I was sweeping in the archive, I’d come across a new story in a fandom I might not normally have pursued for leisure reading, and I’d make a point to go back, read properly, and review. I’m fairly specific about fandoms, however, and I have my personal squicks which I will avoid diligently for leisure reading, so I might not get around to reading everything. I’m hoping I’ll be able to find more time to just read again, and when I read, I review!