Hyperminimalism

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  1. Like
    Hyperminimalism got a reaction from Slayitalldown in No, seriously, WHAT is good writing?   
    I read this and laughed. As a writer, this is my formula. No, not the 'get-straight-to-the-sex' part, but the focusing on plot and characterization as opposed to rushing into the good stuff, which in my opinion is typically overrated. It's a bonus, but not the goal I am striving for. And I have to admit that it irks me when folks pass up a story simply because it's not riddled with grammar and spelling errors, missing punctuation or the use of too many. Or lacking that immediate gratification with the use of fluff, cuteness, straight-up sex. But who am I to tell those people what they should or shouldn't like? *shrug* In any case, I don't think I can add much to the definition of what 'good writing' is. Everything BronxWench wrote is what I feel good writing should be. Aside from the technical stuff, it becomes very a individual matter, straight down to the genre, setting, time period, sexual orientation, so on and so forth. Good writing is much too detailed to fit into a general description, but you're always going to have a critic or two. Not everyone is going to like what you write, and as long as you have a firm grasp on how to properly use the English language (or whatever language you're writing in), what you like to write is not necessarily going to be the issue.
  2. Like
    Hyperminimalism got a reaction from Kurahieiritr in Reviews anyone?   
    Do you think it's okay for the author to request concrit specifically? Or do you think encouraging readers to explain that that is what the want and what they are looking for might not make much of a difference? If the author says it's okay and explains that is what they are looking for, would it give them the permission they needed to take that step or is it something else?
  3. Like
    Hyperminimalism got a reaction from Kurahieiritr in Reviews anyone?   
    I consider myself to be this type of writer. I write for me, but I post my stories to share with communities such as this one. One of the main reasons I post is to get feedback on my stories. I do enjoy hearing what I can improve upon because it makes me a better writer. It also helps to hear what you're doing well so you can continue doing that, if not improve upon it. But in the last five years or so, maybe even longer, reviews have become a thing of the past. I feel incredibly lucky and excited when I open that email labeled: "You have a new review for..." At this point, I'll take just about anything; however, I will not delete any reviews. It's a practice I have never understood if one is sharing their stories. I will never beg for reviews either, although they really do lend a hand in helping to motivate me. Then again, they are not the reason I would hold a story hostage, and they never will be. It defeats the purpose of sharing and hoping to garner concrit. In turn, I've always made an effort to review everything I read, even if it's to mention that a comma has been used improperly, but the dialogue is really fun and true-to-life (or something of the sort). I guess reviewing is just a dead practice now-a-days.
  4. Like
    Hyperminimalism reacted to pittwitch in Reviews anyone?   
    Most serious writers will welcome reviews of all types. I'd give my eyeteeth for a concrit review but don't beg or whore out for reviews. It is a part of the writing process to find your own voice, a voice that is completely independent from the reviews.
  5. Like
    Hyperminimalism reacted to yukihimedono in Reviews anyone?   
    It's nice to know that there are others who feel the same way I do.
    I'm much like DemonGoddess. When I have time to read something, I review it. My to-read bookmark list is so, so very long.
    trudy,
    One of the things that's keeps me going is that (most of the time) I don't have a set ending, just a vague idea of what I want - so I end up writing and finishing things just so I know how it ends. A good example of this is my Inu-fic, An Unexpected Love. I know that seems silly and as the author, I should know where the story will go and end but sometimes, it's just more fun that way. I find it exciting (does that make me a dork?) and I use a lot of silly things; word prompts, places, actions, colors, events, anything and everything I can think of. I have a lot of OC and original fiction.
    AUL started out as a short five-chapter, lemon-sex-filled story. I was frustrated with another story and just wanted to write something that was completely useless and made no sense what-so-ever. I wanted a break. Unfortunately for me, it became a ridiculous hit. I extended the storyline after talking to a couple of friends, but it's still going through a slow revision process.
    The problem is, my muse is fickle and flighty. It comes and goes when it wants. Thus, my several oneshots, which I don't post anymore due to AUL. Ironic?
    Enough ranting and complaining. What I want is to try to bring this to the attention of the readers. I'd like it to change, as I'm sure other writers would too. I don't mean to threaten them or put a long AN berating them but I was considering offering the ones that reviewed a reward, like a oneshot or drabble. I've got a couple of ideas on how to pick the reviewer, but I'm wondering if anyone else thinks this is a good idea or if I should completely throw it out? I'm not sure if it will increase reviewers but it might help me through word-of-mouth.
    What's sad is that the quote below is on the main page (multiple times) and it's like it doesn't phase people. Do they even read the news?
    "Please remember that this site is free to use. As such, the authors receive nothing for their efforts, except reviews. Do let them know that you read their stories, please! I'm sure they'll appreciate hearing from you!" - Apollo
  6. Like
    Hyperminimalism reacted to krakenknight in Reviews anyone?   
    Totally with you. I try and review every story I read at least once. Its just good manners.
  7. Like
    Hyperminimalism reacted to DemonGoddess in Reviews anyone?   
    When I actually have time to read (rare these days), I make a POINT of leaving a review. If it's awful, I don't pillory the author, I simply leave the story.
  8. Like
    Hyperminimalism reacted to yukihimedono in Reviews anyone?   
    Warning: THIS IS A RANT. My rant.
    Why is it that no one reviews stories anymore? Everytime I read something, I comment - even if it sounds super corny! I think it encourages the writers to work more knowing that there are people that are enjoying their work. And it's a great way to develop your writing skills. It encourages them to continue and get better! I sucked major (really) when I first started writing in 1998. (I think I'm revealing my age, >,<") It's been over ten years and I've gotten more comments and likes from those horribly written fics than I do now. Why is that!?
    Criticism can be bad or good but at least it's something, right? It's within in the perception of the receiver as to whether they take it with a grain of salt or blow it out of proportion. Even though I was starting out, the negative words didn't get to me. The encouraging responses from others were what I focused on. People were reading my work and liking it! It made me feel really happy that my ideas were something worthy of reading. Are people afraid to say anything now? What's wrong with 'I liked it' or 'good job' or 'interesting'? A word at least! I beg you readers, please do something!
    I'm sure that, for people like RosieB, Wheezambu or QuirkySlayer, reviews are what kept them writing through the years. I don't know anyone who hasn't heard of 'Beside You in Time', 'Possession' or 'By the River of Shadowed Moments'. These weren't written quickly but, at the same time, are some well-written and thought-out stories that have so many complexities. Sure you have to wait for chapters but I don't mind and several hundreds of others don't either.
    To be honest, I've written thousand of pages, several oneshots and tons of ideas, but most of my work isn't published. I don't post it because I don't see a point - to a certain extent. I do have friends that read what I write and urge me to continue but I write for myself, like every other fanfiction author, more than anything else. And like everyone else, real life gets in my way, but I believe that I would post more if I knew that there were people that enjoyed what I have to write and say. I feel like I'm in a stalemate. I only get feedback from a limited audience and would much rather prefer honest thoughts from others. I'm never going to met you. And even if I do, what are the chances with seven billion people on the planet?
    So please, take a minute or two and just say something. If you like an author, review their work - encourage them. If you don't like a work, at least find something nice to say to balance the negative comment. You don't have to be harsh, bad comments can be more helpful than good ones if they are worded correctly. And if you don't want to post it for others to read, then PM them. Just do something.
  9. Like
    Hyperminimalism reacted to trudyw000 in Reviews anyone?   
    Can I just say thank heaven I'm not the only one thinking this. It's really disheartening to slave over a story and put it out there for everyone to read and to get no feedback on it. I feel like I'm writing in a vacuum much of the time and I agree with you, I'm wondering why bother posting stories. I haven't been involved with fan fic as long as the original poster and I know that I have'nt reviewed as often as I could have in the past, however I'm trying to change that now.
    I spend hours putting together a chapter that typically has around 4000 words, is it so much to ask that people who read it leave a small comment. I'm not even saying that I expect everyone who reads my stories to post glowing reviews about how they love every word I write, it's perfectly alright not to like it but tell me about in a constructive way that helps me understand what I'm doing wrong and how to correct it. I may not always make changes especially if it's more of a difference of opinion than me making a mistake but I'll always listen and respond.
    I've made a personal resolution that I will review every story that I read, unless it's completely awful. If people are reading my stories and not reviewing then I have to assume that they consider the story awful and I won't waste their time or mine with further updates.
  10. Like
    Hyperminimalism got a reaction from Slayitalldown in No, seriously, WHAT is good writing?   
    I read this and laughed. As a writer, this is my formula. No, not the 'get-straight-to-the-sex' part, but the focusing on plot and characterization as opposed to rushing into the good stuff, which in my opinion is typically overrated. It's a bonus, but not the goal I am striving for. And I have to admit that it irks me when folks pass up a story simply because it's not riddled with grammar and spelling errors, missing punctuation or the use of too many. Or lacking that immediate gratification with the use of fluff, cuteness, straight-up sex. But who am I to tell those people what they should or shouldn't like? *shrug* In any case, I don't think I can add much to the definition of what 'good writing' is. Everything BronxWench wrote is what I feel good writing should be. Aside from the technical stuff, it becomes very a individual matter, straight down to the genre, setting, time period, sexual orientation, so on and so forth. Good writing is much too detailed to fit into a general description, but you're always going to have a critic or two. Not everyone is going to like what you write, and as long as you have a firm grasp on how to properly use the English language (or whatever language you're writing in), what you like to write is not necessarily going to be the issue.
  11. Like
    Hyperminimalism got a reaction from Slayitalldown in No, seriously, WHAT is good writing?   
    I read this and laughed. As a writer, this is my formula. No, not the 'get-straight-to-the-sex' part, but the focusing on plot and characterization as opposed to rushing into the good stuff, which in my opinion is typically overrated. It's a bonus, but not the goal I am striving for. And I have to admit that it irks me when folks pass up a story simply because it's not riddled with grammar and spelling errors, missing punctuation or the use of too many. Or lacking that immediate gratification with the use of fluff, cuteness, straight-up sex. But who am I to tell those people what they should or shouldn't like? *shrug* In any case, I don't think I can add much to the definition of what 'good writing' is. Everything BronxWench wrote is what I feel good writing should be. Aside from the technical stuff, it becomes very a individual matter, straight down to the genre, setting, time period, sexual orientation, so on and so forth. Good writing is much too detailed to fit into a general description, but you're always going to have a critic or two. Not everyone is going to like what you write, and as long as you have a firm grasp on how to properly use the English language (or whatever language you're writing in), what you like to write is not necessarily going to be the issue.