StoryJunkie

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  1. Like
    StoryJunkie got a reaction from Kurahieiritr in Throw your ideas in here!   
    I notice alot of animes deal with the afterworld, like DeathNote and Bleach. Is there a fascination for this thing?
    Anywho...just thought I'd throw that in there.
    Randomly.
    I like a story that goes along dangerous lines. Very often, I'll have a dream and I'll re-live it over and over making sure I got every detail described down to a "T"
    For instance, this morning, I dreampt that we lived on a very remote ranch, and as I opened the door to let our cat in, I saw in the distance, a leopard, a grizzly and a cougar respond to my call.
    The hillside was sparsely treed with an old stand of spruce, so I could see them moving toward me, downhill, rushing with a speed that alarmed me. They knew the door was closing, and I didn't want to leave the cat out with THEM, so I had to hold it open. The moment the cat ran in, I closed the door (the leopard was SO close!), and I thought: "Where are my kids?"
    There are some nights when I wake up I'm glad there's a body next to me to hang on to.
  2. Like
    StoryJunkie got a reaction from Kurahieiritr in Throw your ideas in here!   
    I notice alot of animes deal with the afterworld, like DeathNote and Bleach. Is there a fascination for this thing?
    Anywho...just thought I'd throw that in there.
    Randomly.
    I like a story that goes along dangerous lines. Very often, I'll have a dream and I'll re-live it over and over making sure I got every detail described down to a "T"
    For instance, this morning, I dreampt that we lived on a very remote ranch, and as I opened the door to let our cat in, I saw in the distance, a leopard, a grizzly and a cougar respond to my call.
    The hillside was sparsely treed with an old stand of spruce, so I could see them moving toward me, downhill, rushing with a speed that alarmed me. They knew the door was closing, and I didn't want to leave the cat out with THEM, so I had to hold it open. The moment the cat ran in, I closed the door (the leopard was SO close!), and I thought: "Where are my kids?"
    There are some nights when I wake up I'm glad there's a body next to me to hang on to.
  3. Like
    StoryJunkie got a reaction from banana-x-phone in Is Anyone Here A Review Whore?   
    as much as I love recieving, there is nothing I love more than posting a review. I am so full of myself I'm dazed for a couple of days after leaving a particularly good review. (Sheesh, I'm so preachy!)
    The elements of a good review: 1) NEVER say: "I know what's going to happen to so and so, you're going to do such and such, aren't you?" This is the worst review, aside from a flame that one person can give to an author. Muses get chased away by good guessers. So even if you know where the story is headed, DON'T SAY IT.
    2) DON'T tell the author what to do with their story, even if they ask. If you can't hold back, email them, don't tell them in a review. "Oh, please let the mother live!" when obviously, she's doomed.
    3) Always describe how the work made you FEEL, even if it was negative. An author might have been going for that feeling, and to hold back here is death to the story. For example, a certain passage grossed you out, so just say so, then bring up another example of how the author evoked another feeling from you. Authors are trying their best to connect to their readers, not just trying to connect to themselves. If no one is telling that author how that story made them feel, then they might think that the story isn't worth telling.
    4) Hey, poster below me, what's another element of a good review?
  4. Like
    StoryJunkie got a reaction from banana-x-phone in Is Anyone Here A Review Whore?   
    as much as I love recieving, there is nothing I love more than posting a review. I am so full of myself I'm dazed for a couple of days after leaving a particularly good review. (Sheesh, I'm so preachy!)
    The elements of a good review: 1) NEVER say: "I know what's going to happen to so and so, you're going to do such and such, aren't you?" This is the worst review, aside from a flame that one person can give to an author. Muses get chased away by good guessers. So even if you know where the story is headed, DON'T SAY IT.
    2) DON'T tell the author what to do with their story, even if they ask. If you can't hold back, email them, don't tell them in a review. "Oh, please let the mother live!" when obviously, she's doomed.
    3) Always describe how the work made you FEEL, even if it was negative. An author might have been going for that feeling, and to hold back here is death to the story. For example, a certain passage grossed you out, so just say so, then bring up another example of how the author evoked another feeling from you. Authors are trying their best to connect to their readers, not just trying to connect to themselves. If no one is telling that author how that story made them feel, then they might think that the story isn't worth telling.
    4) Hey, poster below me, what's another element of a good review?