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PMantis42

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Hey everyone, I'm having a bit of a 'discussion' with a friend of mine. He keeps referring to ALL fanfics as "slash" while I have come to understand the term to mean stories about same-sex pairings. He claims that the term originally meant what I think, but has since been bastardized into meaning any type of fanfic. I'd love to say that we are on equal footing here, but he's got people backing him! ^_^ I was wondering what you fellow fanfic authors and afficianadoes think about this. I normally wouldn't bother, but his improper use of the English language is legendary in our little collective. Tell me what you think, okay?

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Hey everyone, I'm having a bit of a 'discussion' with a friend of mine. He keeps referring to ALL fanfics as "slash" while I have come to understand the term to mean stories about same-sex pairings. He claims that the term originally meant what I think, but has since been bastardized into meaning any type of fanfic. I'd love to say that we are on equal footing here, but he's got people backing him! ^_^ I was wondering what you fellow fanfic authors and afficianadoes think about this. I normally wouldn't bother, but his improper use of the English language is legendary in our little collective. Tell me what you think, okay?

No, you are absolutely right. Fanfiction is fanfiction. Slash fanfiction is fanfiction with m/m pairings.

Although personally, I prefer the term yaoi. Hey, it's a genre, just like slash.

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Technically, yaoi would apply to fanfiction based on anime and manga (and other stuff from Japan with fiction written about it), whereas slash covers all the rest of the m/m pairings ^_^

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I suppose it's possible that someone or a group of someones could start using 'slash' to refer to any and all fanfiction. And as long as the reader/listener understands how they are using it, it'll be alright.

But if someone recommends some 'slash' fanfic to most fanficfans, and there isn't a male-slash-male relationship in the narrative, many of them're going to be disappointed.

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There are two interesting wikipedia articles (here and here) that deal with this. My understanding is that the term slash originally comes from the / used to separate any two (or more) characters having a romantic relationship (heterosexual, homosexual, or other) but that now it is most often used to represent a (male) homosexual pairing.

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There are two interesting wikipedia articles (here and here) that deal with this. My understanding is that the term slash originally comes from the / used to separate any two (or more) characters having a romantic relationship (heterosexual, homosexual, or other) but that now it is most often used to represent a (male) homosexual pairing.

Intriguing, very intriguing. Thanks for all of your responses. Hopefully, I have enough info to get my buddy to stop using the term incorrectly now.

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As far as I know "slash" just means same sex pairings.

Nothing more...

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Slash fanfiction is termed by definition any story/narrative with a couple relationship of two people of the same gender and would be therefore be a same-sex coupling. Anime and Manga use the term yaoi for male relationships of this type and the term yuri for female relationships in a similar situation to a yaoi one of males. Any genre of fanfiction outside of Anime and/or Manga would use the terms slash for male relationships and femme-slash for female relationships in a story that were of same-gender couplings.

Also, please note that any relationship containing three people is known as a threesome. It can contain/consist of all male or females, and it could also be mixed as well. Four or more in a relationship within a story is known as a Moresome. The same rules as a threesome apply in the way the couplings can be set-up. However inside of a threesome/moresome relationship and if the people are mixed in gender; any relations between two males or two females alone of the three or more partners is a standalone section of slash or femme-slash itself. It dissects from the opposite gender to have more intricate design to add depth to the plot of the story. This is because usually the opposite gender is still with the others and partakes in 'activities' with the others as well, but in this segment they are just not present to the scene or not included into it for the plot-line to flow as it is supposed to.

I hope this very long explanation helps you

Cheers and Happy Reading!

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